Grooming advice to keep dogs clean and healthy

(Family Features) Regular grooming can keep your dog looking and smelling his or her best, but it’s also important for maintaining health. If you choose to groom at home rather than opting for (often expensive) professional care, it’s an opportunity to examine your pet for potential concerns.

A proper grooming routine starts with the right tools. Consider these suggestions from The Humane Society of the United States:

Trimming Nails
When your dog’s nails nearly touch the ground, it’s time for a trim, typically every 3-4 weeks. Trimming the part of the nail that turns down helps prevent pain and damage to paws.

If your dog has white nails, avoid cutting the “quick,” the pink part visible on white nails, which bleeds when cut. For dark nails, simply trim a bit at a time until evidence of the quick is visible.

Bathing and Brushing
Frequency for baths and brushing depends on your dog’s coat type – be sure to research optimal grooming schedules based on his or her breed. In general, The Humane Society of the United States recommends these guidelines:

  • Short, smooth or wiry coat: Brush with a rubber-bristled brush once a week.
  • Long, silky or curly coat: Brush once daily with a rubber-bristled or wire slicker brush. Use a steel comb to prevent tangles or mats, if necessary.
  • Double coat: Use an undercoat rake or de-shedding tool to gently de-shed once a week in addition to regular brushing routines.

When it’s bath time, use a shampoo formulated for dogs and a damp cloth or cotton ball to clean around the eyes and ears without pushing anything into the eyes or ears. Dry with a microfiber towel or hair dryer on a low setting.

Cutting Fur
Be careful and work slowly to avoid mistakes and keep your dog calm and comfortable. Brush, bathe and completely dry prior to cutting fur with blunt-ended shears or small clippers with guide combs. Specifically trim hair covering the eyes and private areas and between your pup’s paw pads. It may be helpful to watch a tutorial online to ensure success.

Brushing Teeth
You can prevent gum disease and plaque buildup by brushing your dog’s teeth with a soft toothbrush and dog-friendly toothpaste. Make sure your pet is comfortable and start slow, staying on the outside surfaces of teeth and gently rubbing back and forth. Focus on the area where the tooth surface meets the gum.

You can find more pet health advice at eLivingtoday.com.

Troy Petenbrink

Troy, also known as The Gay Traveler, is a well known travel and food writer. His has been a regular contributor to a variety of outlets including National Geographic, Travel Channel, DCRefined, CBS Local, and Metro Weekly. He also appears on local Washington news outlets as a travel expert.

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